Home > Green Buildings > Eco-Housing in the UK

Eco-Housing in the UK

By: James Murray-White - Updated: 3 May 2016 | comments*Discuss
 
Eco-building Sustainable Development

Eco-housing, or houses built in accordance with the principles of sustainable development, which use resources and technologies that capitalise on renewability, are a fast-developing industry in the UK. These projects range from individual projects to whole estates, designed to accommodate and create a new community.

Individual or one-off projects, such as those detailed on other pages on this website such as example yurts, straw-bale houses or dwellings built underground, might reflect the owner or architects unique vision. Where as estates need to incorporate ecological design and 'green thinking' into projects and buildings that can appeal to a wider group of people. So how can eco-housing live alongside or even replace traditional housing units and estates in the UK?

This article will look at 3 examples of larger ecologically-built projects.

The Bed ZED Project, London

The Bed ZED Project, or Beddington Zero Energy Development, is the UK's largest carbon-neutral eco-community in the UK. It was built in 2002 in Wallington, Surrey,Within the London Borough of Sutton, and comprises of 82 residential homes.The Project was developed by the Peabody Trust, a social housing initiative in London, that aims to fight poverty within the capital. The intention with this project,built in partnership with both an architect and an environmental consultancy firm, was to create a housing project that incorporates new approaches to energy conservation and sustainability, and also to build a thriving community to live within it.

The houses are equipped with key features, both technological and common sense - for example, designed in south facing terraces to maximise solar heat gain, that utilise renewable, and conservable, energy. A small-scale combined heat and power plant on site, powered by wood off-cuts, provides most of the energy to the estate. All buildings have a thick insulation jacket, made from recycled materials. The project has a legally-binding green transport plan, incorporating a car pool system for residents, great public transport links, and is linked in to a cycling network.For these, and many more social and environmental initiatives and technologies,Bed ZED has won many national and International awards for sustainability, design, Innovation and more. It is an inspiring achievement on a local and social level.

Slateford Green Housing, Edinburgh

A second public housing eco-project is the Slateford Green Estate, in Edinburgh.The project, consisting of 120 homes, was developed by a housing association together with the Scottish housing agency, in 2000, at a cost of £9.5 million.

It is a car-free estate, with the space that parking would have consumed, instead being used for gardens, allotments and a large children's play area, around a large central pond with environment-friendly reed beds. The reed beds filter the quality of surface and storm water. This artificial wetland area has been planted with native, low maintenance species, chosen to encourage wildlife. Some of the features in the houses include insulation from recycled newspapers, photovoltaics, a recyclable aluminium roof, and a breathing wall membrane, layered upon an engineered timber structure.

The Findhorn Foundation Eco-Village

On Scotland's north-east coast, near the town of Forres, is the Findhorn Foundation, an intentional community, based upon the values of spirituality and sustainable living.Part of its project is an eco-village, which consists of 45 ecologically-built buildings (so far, although the vision is much more). They have developed a unique construction system that is energy efficient and environmentally sound.All the buildings features are ecological innovations. Some of the original buildings are reconstructed whiskey barrels, bought from nearby distilleries; and there are also later-built straw bale houses and earth ships, which use recycled car tyres.

It is a wonderful place, well worth a visit, and the ecovillage project is a tremendous resource or education and information about building 'green'.

These 3 examples are just the larger examples of eco-building in the UK.It is important to understand how these examples have placed both the concept of building with sustainable resources, and creating a vibrant human community at the core of their philosophy. These 2 parts form the central structure of the principle of sustainable development - for now, and for future generations.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
LLoyd - Your Question:
I am at the stage where I am commissioning the frame of my house with the intention of it being constructed by end of June so I can start hempcreting in July. Unfortunately, the framers have come back and said that I need steel and racking boards. I have been told that steel in hempcrete is not a good idea because the lime would corrode the steel and the steel would need to be visible so it can be inspected. I have also been told that the hempcrete will not dry with the racking boards on. The framers have said that they do not have any data to persuade them that the building will stand without racking boards and therefore they would need to be fitted before the hempcrete is placed. The framers have suggested a wood fibre alternative with a precast hempcrete block to add mass to the walls.Can anyone provide some independent advice?The following are the specific questions: - Steel in Hempcrete - is this an issue? - Is there any data to demonstrate to the framers that racking boards aren't required? - In comparison to Hempcrete, what properties would wood fibre board provide, or even warmcell or rockwool?Thank you!

Our Response:
We've passed this on to a hempcrete expert who might be able to come back with an answer for you but in the meantime here are some useful links:
Homes in Harmony - say that steel can be used but needs to be treated for moisture resistance.
UK Hempcrete has some useful information
BREhas a guide to Hemplime and other low impact building materials.
SustainableBuild - 5-May-16 @ 10:09 AM
3 Bed house on award winning ECO estate £325,000 OIRO 4 year old detached eco-house on a unique small estate with allotments, chicken, pig and bee keeping groups, an orchard, woodland and a variety of community activities which residents can opt in or out of. On the edge of the vibrant market town of Bishop’s Castle with several thriving pubs, 2 micro-breweries, local shops, schools, farmers market, sports centre etc. In an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty popular with walkers, cyclists, artists, naturalists and musicians and only a short drive to the picturesque towns of Ludlow, Hereford and Shrewsbury and 40 mins to the M54. 01588 638996 / 07715745175 and on Rightmove
ecoliving - 3-May-16 @ 10:02 AM
I am at the stage where I am commissioning the frame of my house with the intention of it being constructed by end of June so I can start hempcreting in July.Unfortunately, the framers have come back and said that I need steel and racking boards.I have been told that steel in hempcrete is not a good idea because the lime would corrode the steel and the steel would need to be visible so it can be inspected.I have also been told that the hempcrete will not dry with the racking boards on.The framers have said that they do not have any data to persuade them that the building will stand without racking boards and therefore they would need to be fitted before the hempcrete is placed.The framers have suggested a wood fibre alternative with a precast hempcrete block to add mass to the walls. Can anyone provide some independent advice? The following are the specific questions: - Steel in Hempcrete - is this an issue? - Is there any data to demonstrate to the framers that racking boards aren't required? - In comparison to Hempcrete, what properties would wood fibre board provide, or even warmcell or rockwool? Thank you!
LLoyd - 2-May-16 @ 3:29 PM
I'm so glad every time I see Eco-projects like these happening more and more often nowadays.It's always good to know that people are starting to think about ways of building for the future using sustainable methods. I personally work with a smart heating controller called Heat Genius that also helps people save energy and money, so I strongly believe the energy saving when building new properties or renovating is do-able. It's very strange but apparently the technology is the one that can help us think more about our environment.
InstallerDave - 16-Dec-14 @ 12:56 PM
I’m Meng CAI from Eco-City and Green Building Journal which is hosted by the School of Architecture, Tsinghua University. I’m writing to you for the issue concerning green building. Actually, our journal is arranging a 10 days professional trip regarding to green building in UK for the coming year. I’m in charge of preparing the itinerary. Could you please recommend some recent eco-buildings to visit in UK, especially on low carbon building?
Tsaimeng - 22-Sep-14 @ 9:20 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
SEARCH OUR SUSTAINABLE BUILD DIRECTORY...
IN TOWN / POSTCODE:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • Daphne
    Re: What is Woodwool and is it Safe?
    What could be a suitable infrastructure works on 10 acre brownfield site where an investor intend to develop a two storey…
    25 March 2017
  • ching
    Re: Pollution From Construction
    my dads recently started a build and this will help me tell him about the different types of pollution as I want to protect the…
    23 March 2017
  • ching
    Re: Pollution From Construction
    thanks guys this website really helped my learning
    23 March 2017
  • MLK
    Re: The Problem With Fossil Fuels
    I have a dream that, My milk shake brings all the boys to the yard, And there like, Its better than yours, Damn right its better…
    16 March 2017
  • flubber
    Re: Insulation Materials
    Good Afternoon, My name is Mohammed, and I have been assigned a task from college to hypothetically build and new college building. we as…
    16 March 2017
  • Spenno
    Re: Pollution From Construction
    Hey just wondering if there is any information about the author, Jennifer Gray, i'm sourcing this website as a good source but need…
    16 March 2017
  • Funky
    Re: Compost Toilets
    Hi I have a Narrowboat & I am thing about get a soil tolet. Have any of you had problems with using one on a Narrowboat what sort would be best to…
    7 March 2017
  • Prof. Bartholemew
    Re: Pollution From Construction
    I have done research and i can confirm that there is no such thing as global warming and pollution. Its all a lie.
    28 February 2017
  • Names Rango
    Re: What is Green Architecture ?
    Want me to share my minecraft coordinates
    27 February 2017
  • The Doctor
    Re: What is Green Architecture ?
    This seems like a Green Architect teacher wrote this.
    27 February 2017
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the SustainableBuild website. Please read our Disclaimer.